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Construction Workers and the Risk of Falls

When it comes to death in construction, falls are the top cause. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports “in 2018, there were 320 fatal falls to a lower level out of 1,008 construction fatalities (BLS data)” and goes on to say “these deaths are preventable.” In their Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that “falls remain a leading cause of unintentional injury mortality nationwide.” Furthermore, countless other workers experience serious fall-related injuries every year. These are troubling statistics, especially considering they are preventable.

What steps must employers take to prevent team member falls, and what can workers do to stay safe? Keep reading to learn more, and contact us if you or a loved one suffered a fall from a ladder, scaffolding, roof or other heights in South Carolina. Trust John Price Law Firm, LLC to help you through the workers’ compensation process so you receive the fair compensation you deserve to cover medical bills, lost wages and more. Today’s post covers regulations to protect workers and shares safety guides, fact sheets and booklets available to help reduce the risk of falls. 

Regulations To Protect Workers 

OSHA urges employers to help prevent falls through safety planning, proper equipment and equipment training and has strict requirements in place for construction sites which include:

  • Each worker on a scaffold that is more than 10 feet above another level must be protected from falling to the lower level.
  • Adequate fall protection may either consist of a personal fall arrest system or a guardrail system that meets OSHA requirements.
  • Employees engaged in overhand bricklaying work from supported scaffolds must be guarded against falls from all open sides of the scaffold (except where the wall is being laid).

Being Informed on the Job
The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’ Ladder Safety Guide maps out clear guidelines for ladder use. It begins with choosing the right ladder, giving it a careful inspection, following proper setup and using the ladder safely. Their working load chart and maximum work height chart are also important to note (pay attention to the ladder type, duty rating and working load). There are also ladder safety guidance fact sheets and booklets available from OSHA with specifics on extension ladders, job-made wooden ladders and stepladders. 

We Are Here to Help
John Price Law Firm, LLC represents construction site workers and others in South Carolina who have suffered from an on-the-job injury. We offer a free consultation and 24-hour answering service. We have five convenient locations, with three South Carolina locations being fully staffed with full-time attorneys and experienced support staff, or we can meet you at your home or hospital, with evening and weekend appointments available. Call John Price Law Firm, LLC at 843-594-0515. 

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